Today’s Mariner Squalls (01/24/14)

== Guess the Third Mariner Showing Up on the MLB.com Prospect List ==

Taijuan Walker, no-brainer.  No. 6 overall; No. 2 RH pitcher (after Archie Bradley of Arizona).

D.J. Peterson, ya youbetcha.  No. 88 overall; No. 8 at third base.

Then, there is another …

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wait for it …

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It’s … Tyler Marlette.  Not in the Top 100, but ranked as the No. 10 catching prospect.

Do I agree?  Um, no.

I mean, I haven’t ranked the top 10 minor-league catchers in baseball (maybe there’s a real shortage).  But I don’t even have Marlette as the top catching prospect on his own team!

How does that happen?  Well, I actually like Marlette a lot, but he’s not known for defense and, so far, he hasn’t shown a ton with his bat; at least not enough to have me convinced that he can make it as a major-league hitter.  He made progress this year, but it’s hard to conclude too much since he had a high batting average on balls in play (BABIP) of .360, and that’s not likely to continue.

On the other hand, teammate Marcus Littlewood, despite unimpressive stats on the surface, showed the ability to be a “doubles-and-walks” guy (one of my favorite profiles), and is a switch-hitter who’s flashed skills from both sides of the plate.

ToMAYto, toMAHto as they say … but I wouldn’t put either among the top prospects in all of baseball.

Find the whole thing here.

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Endy Chavez is back!

What can we say about that?  He’s the greatest MLB player of all time with the first name “Endy”?

Yeah, we’ll go with that.

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A “veteran No. 3” is being sought.

And it appears the winner is Scott Baker.  More on that to come.

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Jesus Montero missed most of winter ball after needing stitches on a knuckle after a car accident.”

We missed that one.  Let’s hope Montero’s 2013 calendar is deep in the dustbin of history, and 2014 will be a lot different.

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4 thoughts on “Today’s Mariner Squalls (01/24/14)

  1. I like Marlette a lot, and I have high hopes for the kid. The proverbial jury is still out on him, but if he ends up at AA by the end of this season then we may be able to come close to a judgement on him.

    I really like Endy, and I think that he’s great defensive insurance who can actually hit a little.

    When I read about players missing games for what looks to me to be a powder-puff injury, it makes me angry. When I was much younger I tore the webbing in my skin of my left hand between my thumb and forefinger pretty savagely. I still played two games a week of softball. I usually ended games with a wee touch of blood seeping out, but that just scared the other players… 😉

  2. I like Marlette, too, Lonnie. Just not as much as Jonathan Mayo. I wonder if scouts are talking him up, or if Mayo just liked the surface stats and didn’t dig too deep. OBP = BABIP is a red flag for me. Guess we’ll see.

    • Just a note, Jim, on the way I look at it: minor league BABIP is closer to .330 than .300 (due to worse fielders and no scouting reports for defensive adjustments). .360 isn’t that far out of bounds. Marlette’s career BABIP is .344. Seager’s upper-minor-league BABIP was .370. Franklin’s (including High-Desert) was .340, and Miller was .380, as is Chris Taylor’s. Choi’s is .330 over the last 2 years, and that’s with a pretty horrendous BABIP in Jackson and Tacoma dragging it down (though the Southern League had a prettly low BABIP this year as a whole).

      If you hit the ball hard in the minors it’s very likely to find gaps. A consistently high (but not outrageous) BABIP usually means good things, not bad ones. Catricala and Romero posting BABIP’s over .400 raise my it’s-luck eyebrows, but Marlette’s not doing that at the moment for me. He even did most of his damage against same-handed pitching, so even though he’s a part-timer it wasn’t because he was platooning to get an advantage. I don’t see his numbers as illegitimate, even though it’s only half-a-season of ABs.

  3. Pingback: Today’s Mariner Squalls (01/27/14) | Mariner Brainstorm

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